Tag Archives: Drug Policy

Drug Policy – Fail

 

The Solution of The Drug Problem

 

Drug Dealers out of Business… no more “pushers”:

 

With the Legalization of Drugs, the big billion dollar business of drugs would stop immediately.., the Drug Dealers are the most violently opposed to Legalization of Drugs.

 

As a consequence, there would not be dealers ‘pushing” drugs in our streets and schools, and the number of new addicts due to this big business would disappear.

 

End of Drug Crime:

 

Most of the crime due to drugs would stop, because most of the drug related crime, contrary to alcohol, occurs when the addict is in need of money to buy the drug, not when he has taken it.

 

If Drugs are legalized, the addict would not have to pay huge amounts of money for his drug, up to S200 for a S4 product!, and therefore, he would not have to commit so many crimes to obtain the money.

 

If an alcoholic or a smoker would have to pay $200 for a $4 bottle or a $4 pack, the’ would become criminals, like the addicts, in order to obtain the money.. – In my Medical Office I have seen addicts spending $600 daily for drugs that cost me  $10!.

 

The crimes of the drugs lords competing for territory would also be immediately abolished, because there would be no more drugs lords!,, and no more crimes of not paying any taxes on billions of dollars.

 

Present addicts would have a bonanza, because they could get their drug at normal prices, and probably they would use even more at the beginning. But their crimes would be like nothing compared with the real crimes they actually commit when they urgently need the drug and do not have the huge amounts of money they need to get it.

 

The behavior of the drug-addict is usually different from that of the alcoholic: The alcoholic hits his wife, the addict lets his wife hit him.

 

By now, there is no doubt that most “drug-related murders are the result of drug prohibition. The same kind of violence that came with the Eighteenth’s Amendment ban of alcohol in 1920: The last year of  Prohibition the number of homicides rose to 12,124, and declined to 8,048 after the repeal of Prohibition, in 1941; and the number of assaults came down from 7,863 to 4,525.

 

Repeal of Prohibition was not a capitulation to Al Capone and his ilk, but a means of putting the bootleggers out of business and eliminating most of the crime and costs associated with the Prohibition Laws.

  

Education and Programs against Drug-Addiction… lots of money!

 

The Government is spending actually 10 billion dollars a year in the Drugs War. Besides, the big Business of Drugs do not pay any taxes,.. the SlO billion, plus the tax revenues of selling the drugs is a lot of money that can be used to promote education in Large scale, and many programs against drugs use and abuse.

 

The Actual Addicts: People with a sickness:

 

The addicts would not be considered criminals anymore. but people with a sickness, like alcoholics, and they would have the chance to be treated as such by programs sponsored by the government, similar to those private, actually in existence. Those programs would cost the government a fraction of what it is actually spending to fight drugs.

 

The Pharmacists dispensing the drugs would accompany the product with an “instruction label” explaining honestly the effects of the drug and its real dangers, because, in the heat of the fight, some effects of the drugs have been either overlooked or exaggerated. -. and this would serve as an educational tool, and as an honest warning.

 

The Methadone Program in New York, and the Doctor’s prescriptions of heroine in the Netherlands and Switzerland are good successful examples to fight the problem of drugs.

 

Drug use would not increase:

 

24% of Americans believe that Legalization of Drugs is the solution of the Drug Problem. But many Americans perceive drug legalization as an invitation to drug-infested anarchy. And it is not true: Some people would like to try drugs, once they are available, at reasonable prices, with pure reliable drugs.. and it would lead to a new kind of addicts… however, I believe they would be less in number than those actually “pushed’ into drugs in our schools and streets by the drug-dealers, whose only lucrative business is to push people into drugs and to exploit them… These drug-dealers are totally opposed to the legalization of drugs… and it is a good sign for making them legal…

 

illicit drugs are different that alcohol and tobacco: They are not “social drugs”, and the drugs and methods of consumption are most risky, and unlikely to prove appealing to many people, precisely because they are so obviously dangerous… most Americans would not inject cocaine or heroine in their veins even if given the chance to do so legally.

 

It is also important to know that now a days we can design an effective plan for legalization, after the experiences with tobacco and alcohol abuse… we have learned something from our past experiences:

 

Bans on advertising, campaigns of negative advertising, restriction on time and place of sale, prohibition of consumption in public places, education programs…

 

Legalization of drugs is a leap onto the unknown. no government has ever tried it really! . it may be a risk-v business, but I believe it is worth and prudent to try it Often, legalization is repeatedly and vociferously dismissed: without an attempt to evaluate it openly and objectively. Drug addiction is currently a disaster, the Drugs War is a failure, the only beneficiaries of the actual drug laws are the traffickers…

The war on drugs in America is failing: Thirty million people in America use illegal drugs. Two and a half million of them are addicts, 67% of young Americans try an illicit drug before they finish high school, pushed by the dealers . . and without trying legalization we may never find the best solution for our drug problem.

 

Solutions that may help to solve the Problem of Drugs:

 

Taken from LEGALIZE, based on 8223 responses in America, about what may be helpful and important in solving the drug problem:

 

  • Legalizing Marijuana: 84%
  • Improving the quality of public school education: 60%
  • Spending more on drugs treatment programs: 50%
  • Spending more on anti-drug education in schools: 43%
  • Encouraging more community and police partnerships: 37%
  • Legalizing all drugs: 24%
  • Spending more on anti-drug programs to drug producing countries: 14%
  • Hiring more police: 12%
  • Building more prisons: 5%

 

Prominent People Advocating Legalization of Drugs

The solution of the Drug Problem:

http://reigioncults.con1.drugssolution.htm

On the Internet:

 

Prohibition is an awful trip.

 

The Case for Legalization.

 

Should Drugs be Legalized?

 

Getting Off Drugs:

The Legalization Option

 

Alternatives to the War on Drugs:

The Legalization of Drugs

 

NFIA Legalization of Drugs

Legalization of Drugs:

The governor of New Mexico proposed legalizing drugs last week.

 

It might surprise you to know that a very large proportion of economists share that drugs should be legal.

The Ultimate Weapon to Win the War on Drugs: Legalization

 

Spotlight on Medical Marijuana from Free-Market. Net:

The Freedom Network

 

Drugs Laws Do More Harm Than Good:

Repeal Them

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There’s more collateral damage than victories in this War on Drugs

There’s more collateral damage than victories in this War on Drugs

Shayne Morrow, Alberni Valley Times

Published: Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Just a random sampling of headlines should be enough to convince the average reader that there’s no winners in the war on drugs. At least, not on the side of the alleged good guys.

This week, pot activist Marc Emery was to surrender himself to Canadian authorities, who will in turn transport him to their counterparts in the U.S., where he will serve five years in prison for selling millions of dollars worth of marijuana seeds by mail.

One can debate the rightness or wrongness of Emery’s business, or the wisdom of marketing anything drug-related in the States, where even puffers can end up doing hard time.

The Truth about The American Drug War

 The War on Drugs

June 14, 2010

Since 1970, $33 billion has been spent marketing drug prevention campaigns to school kids. However, from 1970, the decrease in drug use among high school students is still 0%. In reality, the increase in Americans who will try drugs this year compared to 1970 is 10 million. Someone is arrested for violating the drug law every 17 seconds, and 37 million people have been arrested in the US for drug crimes. The total amount spent on those arrests comes to $121 billion. As the numbers of drug users increases, the numbers of visits to the doctor will correlate, especially in the near future. Medical billing and coding specialists are needed by all doctors, which means that this is a profession that will not become obsolete, but rather the demand for it is perpetually growing. Furthermore, medical billing and coding specialists are needed to aid millions of Americans involved with drugs.

The War on Drugs
Truth About The War on Drugs

Via: Medical Coding Certification

U.S. Attorney in Manhattan Is Creating Drug-Terrorism Unit – NYTimes.com

 January 18, 2010

United States Attorney Plans Drug-Terrorism Unit

By WILLIAM K. RASHBAUM

The United States attorney in Manhattan is merging the two units in his office that prosecute terrorism and international narcotics cases, saying that he wants to focus more on extremist Islamic groups whose members he believes are increasingly turning to the drug trade to finance their activities.

Some Western law enforcement and intelligence agencies have long pointed to what they say are the symbiotic relationships that sometimes exist between terrorist groups and narcotics traffickers, from Al Qaeda in Afghanistan and Hezbollah in the Middle East to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC. Continue reading U.S. Attorney in Manhattan Is Creating Drug-Terrorism Unit – NYTimes.com

Wired Science News for Your Neurons

Brain-Enhancing Drugs: Legalize ‘Em, Scientists Say

By Brandon Keim December 10, 2008 | 1:09 pm |
Categories:
MedicineRitalin
If drugs can safely give your brain a boost, why not take them? And if you don’t want to, why stop others?

In an era when attention-disorder drugs are regularly — and illegally — being used for off-label purposes by people seeking a better grade or year-end job review, these are timely ethical questions.

The latest answer comes from Nature, where seven prominent ethicists and neuroscientists recently published a paper entitled, “Towards a responsible use of cognitive-enhancing drugs by the healthy.”

In short: Legalize ‘em. Continue reading Wired Science News for Your Neurons

Is alcohol worse than Ecstasy? 2008

Tuesday 5th February 2008, 9pm, BBC Two

Recent research has analysed the link between the harmful effects of drugs relative to their current classification by law with some startling conclusions. Perhaps most startling of all is that alcohol, solvents and tobacco (all unclassified drugs) are rated more dangerous than ecstasy, 4-MTA and LSD (all class A drugs). If the current ABC system is retained, alcohol would be rated a class A drug and tobacco class B.

The scientists involved, including members of the government’s top advisory committee on drug classification, have produced a rigorous assessment of the social and individual harm caused by 20 of the UK’s most dangerous drugs and believe this should form the basis of future ranking. They think the current ABC system is arbitrary and not based on any scientific evidence.

The drug policies have remained unchanged over the last 40 years so should they be reformed in the light of new research?

Continue reading Is alcohol worse than Ecstasy? 2008

FDA Panel Urges Ban on Vicodin, Percocet

“Also recommends dosing limits for OTC painkillers that contain acetaminophen, like Tylenol or Excedrin, because of link to liver damage.”

“TUESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) — The popular prescription painkillers Vicodin and Percocet, which combine acetaminophen with an opiate narcotic, should be banned, and the maximum dose of over-the-counter painkillers with acetaminophen, like Tylenol or Excedrin, should be lowered, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel urged Tuesday.

The panel’s recommendations followed the release of an FDA report last month that found severe liver damage, and even death, can result from a lack of consumer awareness that acetaminophen — which is easier on the stomach than such painkillers as aspirin and ibuprofen — can cause such injury.

The dangers from use or abuse of Vicodin and Percocet may be even more concerning, one key panelist said.

"It seems to me that problems with opiate combinations are clearly more prevalent," Dr. Lewis S. Nelson, chairman of the FDA’s Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee, said during a Tuesday press conference held after the two-day meeting.

Explaining the panel’s 20-17 vote to ban prescription acetaminophen/opiate drugs, Nelson said, "There are many deaths that relate to problems with prescription opiate combination acetaminophen products, whereas the number of deaths clearly related to the over-the-counter products are much more limited."

But the FDA advisers also took aim at over-the-counter (OTC) acetaminophen products. The agency’s report found that many people may consume more than the recommended dose of these pain relievers in the mistaken belief that taking more will prove more effective against pain without posing health risks. Consumers may also not know that acetaminophen is present in many over-the-counter products, including remedies for colds, headaches and fevers, making it possible to exceed the recommended acetaminophen dose, the report said.

Based on that, the FDA advisory panel voted 21-16 to lower the maximum daily dose of nonprescription acetaminophen, which is currently 4 grams — equal to eight pills of a drug such as Extra Strength Tylenol. The panel was not asked to recommend another maximum daily dose.

The panel also voted 24-13 to limit the maximum single dose of acetaminophen to 650 milligrams. The current single dose of Extra Strength Tylenol, for instance, is 1,000 milligrams.

The panel also voted 26-11 to make the 1,000-milligram dose of acetaminophen available only by prescription.

The advisers voted against other safety restrictions for other over-the-counter drugs such as NyQuil or Theraflu, which contain acetaminophen and other ingredients that treat cough and runny nose. Patients often mix the cold medications with pure acetaminophen drugs, like Tylenol, leaving them vulnerable to dangerously high levels of acetaminophen.

The FDA is not obligated to follow the recommendations of its advisory panels, but it typically does so.

Dr. Sandra L. Kweder, deputy director of the FDA’s Office of New Drugs at the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, gave a strong hint of what the agency might do with the advisory panel’s recommendations.

"I think the top recommendation of this committee was that the agency needs to do something to address and decrease the usual dose of acetaminophen, both for over-the-counter products and also prescription combination products," Kweder said during the press conference.

She added, "There was a clear message that there is a high likelihood of overdose from prescription narcotic/acetaminophen combination products. If we don’t eliminate these combination products, we should certainly at least lower the usual acetaminophen dose patients receive in those prescription combination products."

At the very least the agency should require new warning labels on these prescription combinations that alert patients to the potential of liver damage if they take too much acetaminophen, she said.

Speaking for the OTC drug industry, Lynda A. Suydam, of the Consumer Healthcare Products Association (CHPA), said her group was "pleased the committee did not recommend eliminating these important nonprescription products."

However, in a statement, she added that CHPA was "disappointed in [the panel’s] divided vote to lower the maximum daily dose and the single dose of 1000 mg acetaminophen. There was a notable lack of data referenced by the committee to support these recommendations and overwhelmingly strong data affirming the efficacy and safety of acetaminophen in its current dosage forms."

Another expert took a different view. Dr. John H. Klippel, chief executive officer of the Arthritis Foundation, said Tuesday’s votes were very important to "people with arthritis because acetaminophen is a very commonly used medication to control pain."

"Lowering the maximum dose, providing that kind of guidance to patients, if it increases safety, would be something the arthritis community would support," he said. "Every person who takes this drug sees it as valuable, but they want clear guidance so they won’t be harmed by the drug."

Dr. Lewis W. Teperman, director of transplant surgery and vice chairman of surgery at New York University School of Medicine, said he also supported the panel’s decision to recommend lowering doses of acetaminophen.

"It’s not that the doses can get you in trouble, but the very young and the very old can get into trouble easily," he said. Also if you are sick, there is the danger of taking cold remedies that contain acetaminophen plus taking pure acetaminophen drugs as well, he noted.

But Klippel added that the vote to make the 1,000-milligram dose of acetaminophen available by prescription only would overburden the health-care system. "Given the massive number of people who rely on this drug for pain control, making the maximum dose requiring a prescription, I think, is going to place undo burden on the health-care system," he said.

Teperman disagreed.

"The 1,000 milligram pill should never be at the patient’s discretion. It should only be prescribed by a physician," Teperman said. "If you took an entire bottle of Tylenol Extra Strength, three days later you would be in a coma and needing a liver transplant."

For more on acetaminophen, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

SOURCES: June 30, 2009, press conference with Sandra L. Kweder, M.D., deputy director, Office of New Drugs, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Lewis S. Nelson, M.D., chairman, FDA Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee, and associate professor, department of emergency medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center; John H. Klippel, M.D., CEO, Arthritis Foundation; Lewis W. Teperman, M.D., director of transplant surgery, vice chairman of surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York City; June 30, 2009, news release, Consumer Healthcare Products Association; May 28, 2009, news release, U.S. Food and Drug Administration”

 

I wonder what this will do to the millions of people who are in pain consistently.  Conversely what about those in acute pain? The extremely numerous Rx’s written daily for hydrocodone/APAP will not be available… then maybe they should be put over the counter.  Civilized people should be treated as though they have a brain and not looked at in a biblical or moral controlled light which hurts so many due to the prohibition and lack of health care providing adequate pain relief.  I will try and stay on this story… interesting.