Category Archives: Police State

The Drug War’s Effect On Bodies And Minds

The Drug War’s Effect On Bodies And Minds. – DISINFORMATION.COM

The Drug War’s Effect On Bodies And Minds

Posted by JacobSloan onMarch 7, 2012

brokenglassfaceVia Brooklyn Rail, Jason Flores-Williams, a defense lawyer whose father spent sixteen years in prison on drug charges, on the influence of the War on Drugs on how we think:

There are two kinds of power and the drug war’s got them both in spades. The first is we’ll-kick-your-ass power. If you don’t go along with our vision of things, then we’re going to throw you in jail and try to ruin you. It’s the kind of power we think of when we think of China, except that when it comes to the prison-industrial complex we’re actually more repressive than they are.

The second power is foundational to all other forms of power: the power to make people doubt and dislike themselves. All we have to do is look in the mirror to know that the drug war has been an absurdity. Have you ever used drugs? Are you a felon who deserves to go to state prison for it? Are you an enemy of the state? That time last year that you and your husband dropped the kids off for the night at your brother’s house, then smoked weed to have sex in the privacy of your own bedroom—you do realize that makes you a bad person, yes? A good parent would right now call the cops. You should testify against each other. In fact, you and your husband should proceed immediately to the police station and turn yourselves in. And that time last May when your best friend from college came into town and you went out together to that bar that you’ve always wanted to check out and did some blow in the bathroom. Have you reported yourself to the D.E.A.? You unpatriotic scumbag. Or the shrooms you took that Fourth of July at your friend’s pool party—have you cooperated with state and federal authorities, given over the names and addresses of everyone who was there that night? We need you to name names. You must name names. Are you, or have you ever been, a member of the Communist Party?

We let ourselves be criminalized. Forced into the shadows. Made to feel like bad people for relaxing on a Friday night after working 75-hour weeks for the last month and a half. You shouldn’t have been over at your friend’s smoking a joint, talking about what the government needs to do—you should have been back home alone watching TV. We need you isolated. Under control. You don’t know what’s best for you. We know what’s best for you. We are better than you. And everyone on our side, all the people we’ve bought off and put on the payroll, are better than you, too. You just don’t get it: We control the idea of America.

American citizens are being beaten down and oppressed every day because every soul incarcerated means cash money to law enforcement. And more important, the war is a constant reminder that the U.S. government can jail your body and try to own your soul.

I don’t want to sully an article of this calber, but speaking generally America isn’t even remotely in this war.  In fact it has been some time since anyone that isn’t an overbearing sociopath has thought 2 times on the issue to the negative of the current failed (since the 70’s) policy/ policies that we call the rule of law… with a wink, nod, and payment made to South American and Central Asian violent gangs who we probably started or support the fight they do against someone we don’t support for a reason that no one that isn’t on the UNODCP or DEA, INTERPOL, BATFE, or inteligence community INC payment plan could give a half of a shit and 3 drops of piss about.

That’s why Americans sit in jail in the HIGHEST NUMBERS [per capita] in the WORLD (China’s not even close) and you may say: “well those countries just shoot people rather than jail them… guess what ass, we do too.  DEA kicks in the wrong door… bam, your amendment rights are getting on his boot, and what was your floor… before your untimley departure from spaceship earth. Sorry to get all graphic,but this is all too real and it’s time to STOP THE MADNESS! Please do SOMETHING!.

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Drug Policy – Fail

 

The Solution of The Drug Problem

 

Drug Dealers out of Business… no more “pushers”:

 

With the Legalization of Drugs, the big billion dollar business of drugs would stop immediately.., the Drug Dealers are the most violently opposed to Legalization of Drugs.

 

As a consequence, there would not be dealers ‘pushing” drugs in our streets and schools, and the number of new addicts due to this big business would disappear.

 

End of Drug Crime:

 

Most of the crime due to drugs would stop, because most of the drug related crime, contrary to alcohol, occurs when the addict is in need of money to buy the drug, not when he has taken it.

 

If Drugs are legalized, the addict would not have to pay huge amounts of money for his drug, up to S200 for a S4 product!, and therefore, he would not have to commit so many crimes to obtain the money.

 

If an alcoholic or a smoker would have to pay $200 for a $4 bottle or a $4 pack, the’ would become criminals, like the addicts, in order to obtain the money.. – In my Medical Office I have seen addicts spending $600 daily for drugs that cost me  $10!.

 

The crimes of the drugs lords competing for territory would also be immediately abolished, because there would be no more drugs lords!,, and no more crimes of not paying any taxes on billions of dollars.

 

Present addicts would have a bonanza, because they could get their drug at normal prices, and probably they would use even more at the beginning. But their crimes would be like nothing compared with the real crimes they actually commit when they urgently need the drug and do not have the huge amounts of money they need to get it.

 

The behavior of the drug-addict is usually different from that of the alcoholic: The alcoholic hits his wife, the addict lets his wife hit him.

 

By now, there is no doubt that most “drug-related murders are the result of drug prohibition. The same kind of violence that came with the Eighteenth’s Amendment ban of alcohol in 1920: The last year of  Prohibition the number of homicides rose to 12,124, and declined to 8,048 after the repeal of Prohibition, in 1941; and the number of assaults came down from 7,863 to 4,525.

 

Repeal of Prohibition was not a capitulation to Al Capone and his ilk, but a means of putting the bootleggers out of business and eliminating most of the crime and costs associated with the Prohibition Laws.

  

Education and Programs against Drug-Addiction… lots of money!

 

The Government is spending actually 10 billion dollars a year in the Drugs War. Besides, the big Business of Drugs do not pay any taxes,.. the SlO billion, plus the tax revenues of selling the drugs is a lot of money that can be used to promote education in Large scale, and many programs against drugs use and abuse.

 

The Actual Addicts: People with a sickness:

 

The addicts would not be considered criminals anymore. but people with a sickness, like alcoholics, and they would have the chance to be treated as such by programs sponsored by the government, similar to those private, actually in existence. Those programs would cost the government a fraction of what it is actually spending to fight drugs.

 

The Pharmacists dispensing the drugs would accompany the product with an “instruction label” explaining honestly the effects of the drug and its real dangers, because, in the heat of the fight, some effects of the drugs have been either overlooked or exaggerated. -. and this would serve as an educational tool, and as an honest warning.

 

The Methadone Program in New York, and the Doctor’s prescriptions of heroine in the Netherlands and Switzerland are good successful examples to fight the problem of drugs.

 

Drug use would not increase:

 

24% of Americans believe that Legalization of Drugs is the solution of the Drug Problem. But many Americans perceive drug legalization as an invitation to drug-infested anarchy. And it is not true: Some people would like to try drugs, once they are available, at reasonable prices, with pure reliable drugs.. and it would lead to a new kind of addicts… however, I believe they would be less in number than those actually “pushed’ into drugs in our schools and streets by the drug-dealers, whose only lucrative business is to push people into drugs and to exploit them… These drug-dealers are totally opposed to the legalization of drugs… and it is a good sign for making them legal…

 

illicit drugs are different that alcohol and tobacco: They are not “social drugs”, and the drugs and methods of consumption are most risky, and unlikely to prove appealing to many people, precisely because they are so obviously dangerous… most Americans would not inject cocaine or heroine in their veins even if given the chance to do so legally.

 

It is also important to know that now a days we can design an effective plan for legalization, after the experiences with tobacco and alcohol abuse… we have learned something from our past experiences:

 

Bans on advertising, campaigns of negative advertising, restriction on time and place of sale, prohibition of consumption in public places, education programs…

 

Legalization of drugs is a leap onto the unknown. no government has ever tried it really! . it may be a risk-v business, but I believe it is worth and prudent to try it Often, legalization is repeatedly and vociferously dismissed: without an attempt to evaluate it openly and objectively. Drug addiction is currently a disaster, the Drugs War is a failure, the only beneficiaries of the actual drug laws are the traffickers…

The war on drugs in America is failing: Thirty million people in America use illegal drugs. Two and a half million of them are addicts, 67% of young Americans try an illicit drug before they finish high school, pushed by the dealers . . and without trying legalization we may never find the best solution for our drug problem.

 

Solutions that may help to solve the Problem of Drugs:

 

Taken from LEGALIZE, based on 8223 responses in America, about what may be helpful and important in solving the drug problem:

 

  • Legalizing Marijuana: 84%
  • Improving the quality of public school education: 60%
  • Spending more on drugs treatment programs: 50%
  • Spending more on anti-drug education in schools: 43%
  • Encouraging more community and police partnerships: 37%
  • Legalizing all drugs: 24%
  • Spending more on anti-drug programs to drug producing countries: 14%
  • Hiring more police: 12%
  • Building more prisons: 5%

 

Prominent People Advocating Legalization of Drugs

The solution of the Drug Problem:

http://reigioncults.con1.drugssolution.htm

On the Internet:

 

Prohibition is an awful trip.

 

The Case for Legalization.

 

Should Drugs be Legalized?

 

Getting Off Drugs:

The Legalization Option

 

Alternatives to the War on Drugs:

The Legalization of Drugs

 

NFIA Legalization of Drugs

Legalization of Drugs:

The governor of New Mexico proposed legalizing drugs last week.

 

It might surprise you to know that a very large proportion of economists share that drugs should be legal.

The Ultimate Weapon to Win the War on Drugs: Legalization

 

Spotlight on Medical Marijuana from Free-Market. Net:

The Freedom Network

 

Drugs Laws Do More Harm Than Good:

Repeal Them

Opioid Analgesics for Chronic Pain

By Mary Lou Bossio, NP

Chronic pain can be one of the more challenging conditions to manage, especially when it has been refractory to multiple modalities. An appreciation of chronic pain and its prevalence, along with thorough understanding of provider responsibilities, patient rights and the appropriateness of opioid analgesics for this population, are needed. Such knowledge provides a foundation for evaluating chronic pain and developing an individualized management plan. When opioids are used, prepare for both expected and unexpected results.

Chronic pain is pain without apparent biologic value that has persisted beyond the time in which normal healing should have occurred, usually 3 months.1 In 2004, chronic pain was internationally recognized as a major health care problem and a disease in its own right.2 Today, countless medical experts and health agencies contend that chronic pain should be treated with the same priority as the disease that caused it.3

History of Standards

The creation and endorsement of formal guidelines for the use of opioid analgesics in chronic pain management is relatively new. The American Pain Society (APS) and the American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) issued a statement in 1996 to define when and how opioids should be prescribed for patients with chronic pain.4

Despite this formal position, pain continued to be undertreated due to fears of legal and criminal liability for prescribing controlled substances.5,6 This prompted the development and 1998 adoption of the Model Guidelines for the Use of Controlled Substances by the Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States.7 This document, which became policy in 2004, defines when opioids are appropriate for acute and chronic pain and details patient monitoring to deter drug diversion.8,9

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has issued standards on pain assessment and management. The standards, which took effect in 2001, state that all patients have the right to appropriate assessment and management of pain; that all patients should be assessed for pain and receive individualized care; that response to treatment should be monitored; and that treatment plans should be modified when necessary.10

Although the JCAHO standards provided a formal framework for pain management, they did not stipulate how appropriate management would be achieved, and a number of guidelines were subsequently issued.9-12The prevalence of guidelines and JCAHO standards today means that failing to prescribe appropriate medications constitutes undertreatment of pain and a departure from acceptable standards of practice.8

Opioid Need

An analysis of international s
tudies shows that 1 in 5 adults and 1 in 3 older adults experience moderate to severe pain lasting more than 3 to 6 months.1,13 A study of more than 3,500 primary care patients in the United Kingdom found that about half reported pain lasting more than 3 months.
14

And an international study that included the United States revealed that about 20% of more than 5,000 primary care patients experienced pain for more than 6 months.15 Put in everyday terms, as little as 1 in 10 and as many as 1 in 2 patients who present to a health care provider may have chronic pain.

Trends in Prescribing

Arthritis and other musculoskeletal disorders are the most frequently mentioned chronic health conditions significant enough to result in activity limitations among U.S. adults ages 18 to 64.16

An analysis of office visits and opioids prescribed for patients with musculoskeletal disorders in 1980 and 2000 revealed that office visits did not increase for these conditions. This analysis, which was based on data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care survey, also revealed that prescriptions for opioid analgesics for chronic pain doubled (8% to 16%), and the use of stronger opioid analgesics quadrupled (2% to 9%).17

The increase in opioid analgesic prescriptions is a sign that progress has been made in pain management.18-21 However, this trend has not allayed concerns that increased use of opioids would lead to more opioid abuse and addiction. As a result, studies were conducted to identify any abuse of opioid analgesics.

Continue reading Opioid Analgesics for Chronic Pain

Pain-Topics.org News/Research UPDATES: Pain Management Fails Due to Rx-Drug Abuse Fears

In reality, this is a tragedy that has plagued or country since Nixon’s ‘Reign of terror’; i.e. his two-term presidency… the same which caused the continued death toll in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. The terrorism at home was to become an international war, destroying the innermost soul of our police, military and our families in the inner-city, to the suburbs.  The war on drugs became a war on the poor later under Regan/Bush with CRACK.

Fast-Forward to today: M.D.’s  and patients are the newest target of the ‘New Prohibition’.  Doctors are afraid of the “Drug Enforcement Agency” which has become a paramilitary organization fighting against the rights of you and I. They are correct in harboring fears, medical offices must close due to dispensing lifesaving medical treatment to sick people.  All in the name of ‘public safety’ and jaded “morality”.

Opium based treatment options are systematically being eliminated. The Sumerians, Egyptians and the West have safely used opium and newer ‘opiates’ to kill pain and extend the quality of millions of people with minimal division and almost zero risk, but are now “the newest devil” in this costly and dangerous war.

This war has no end; unless saner, cooler heads end what was started almost forty years ago. Shouldn’t we trust our doctors, Government, and Police to have our collective safety – not our systematic demise in mind? Free doctors from this insanity… until this slight is overturned, we cannot truly be free.

Pain-Topics.org News/Research UPDATES: Pain Management Fails Due to Rx-Drug Abuse Fears