Category Archives: History

Drug Policy – Fail

 

The Solution of The Drug Problem

 

Drug Dealers out of Business… no more “pushers”:

 

With the Legalization of Drugs, the big billion dollar business of drugs would stop immediately.., the Drug Dealers are the most violently opposed to Legalization of Drugs.

 

As a consequence, there would not be dealers ‘pushing” drugs in our streets and schools, and the number of new addicts due to this big business would disappear.

 

End of Drug Crime:

 

Most of the crime due to drugs would stop, because most of the drug related crime, contrary to alcohol, occurs when the addict is in need of money to buy the drug, not when he has taken it.

 

If Drugs are legalized, the addict would not have to pay huge amounts of money for his drug, up to S200 for a S4 product!, and therefore, he would not have to commit so many crimes to obtain the money.

 

If an alcoholic or a smoker would have to pay $200 for a $4 bottle or a $4 pack, the’ would become criminals, like the addicts, in order to obtain the money.. – In my Medical Office I have seen addicts spending $600 daily for drugs that cost me  $10!.

 

The crimes of the drugs lords competing for territory would also be immediately abolished, because there would be no more drugs lords!,, and no more crimes of not paying any taxes on billions of dollars.

 

Present addicts would have a bonanza, because they could get their drug at normal prices, and probably they would use even more at the beginning. But their crimes would be like nothing compared with the real crimes they actually commit when they urgently need the drug and do not have the huge amounts of money they need to get it.

 

The behavior of the drug-addict is usually different from that of the alcoholic: The alcoholic hits his wife, the addict lets his wife hit him.

 

By now, there is no doubt that most “drug-related murders are the result of drug prohibition. The same kind of violence that came with the Eighteenth’s Amendment ban of alcohol in 1920: The last year of  Prohibition the number of homicides rose to 12,124, and declined to 8,048 after the repeal of Prohibition, in 1941; and the number of assaults came down from 7,863 to 4,525.

 

Repeal of Prohibition was not a capitulation to Al Capone and his ilk, but a means of putting the bootleggers out of business and eliminating most of the crime and costs associated with the Prohibition Laws.

  

Education and Programs against Drug-Addiction… lots of money!

 

The Government is spending actually 10 billion dollars a year in the Drugs War. Besides, the big Business of Drugs do not pay any taxes,.. the SlO billion, plus the tax revenues of selling the drugs is a lot of money that can be used to promote education in Large scale, and many programs against drugs use and abuse.

 

The Actual Addicts: People with a sickness:

 

The addicts would not be considered criminals anymore. but people with a sickness, like alcoholics, and they would have the chance to be treated as such by programs sponsored by the government, similar to those private, actually in existence. Those programs would cost the government a fraction of what it is actually spending to fight drugs.

 

The Pharmacists dispensing the drugs would accompany the product with an “instruction label” explaining honestly the effects of the drug and its real dangers, because, in the heat of the fight, some effects of the drugs have been either overlooked or exaggerated. -. and this would serve as an educational tool, and as an honest warning.

 

The Methadone Program in New York, and the Doctor’s prescriptions of heroine in the Netherlands and Switzerland are good successful examples to fight the problem of drugs.

 

Drug use would not increase:

 

24% of Americans believe that Legalization of Drugs is the solution of the Drug Problem. But many Americans perceive drug legalization as an invitation to drug-infested anarchy. And it is not true: Some people would like to try drugs, once they are available, at reasonable prices, with pure reliable drugs.. and it would lead to a new kind of addicts… however, I believe they would be less in number than those actually “pushed’ into drugs in our schools and streets by the drug-dealers, whose only lucrative business is to push people into drugs and to exploit them… These drug-dealers are totally opposed to the legalization of drugs… and it is a good sign for making them legal…

 

illicit drugs are different that alcohol and tobacco: They are not “social drugs”, and the drugs and methods of consumption are most risky, and unlikely to prove appealing to many people, precisely because they are so obviously dangerous… most Americans would not inject cocaine or heroine in their veins even if given the chance to do so legally.

 

It is also important to know that now a days we can design an effective plan for legalization, after the experiences with tobacco and alcohol abuse… we have learned something from our past experiences:

 

Bans on advertising, campaigns of negative advertising, restriction on time and place of sale, prohibition of consumption in public places, education programs…

 

Legalization of drugs is a leap onto the unknown. no government has ever tried it really! . it may be a risk-v business, but I believe it is worth and prudent to try it Often, legalization is repeatedly and vociferously dismissed: without an attempt to evaluate it openly and objectively. Drug addiction is currently a disaster, the Drugs War is a failure, the only beneficiaries of the actual drug laws are the traffickers…

The war on drugs in America is failing: Thirty million people in America use illegal drugs. Two and a half million of them are addicts, 67% of young Americans try an illicit drug before they finish high school, pushed by the dealers . . and without trying legalization we may never find the best solution for our drug problem.

 

Solutions that may help to solve the Problem of Drugs:

 

Taken from LEGALIZE, based on 8223 responses in America, about what may be helpful and important in solving the drug problem:

 

  • Legalizing Marijuana: 84%
  • Improving the quality of public school education: 60%
  • Spending more on drugs treatment programs: 50%
  • Spending more on anti-drug education in schools: 43%
  • Encouraging more community and police partnerships: 37%
  • Legalizing all drugs: 24%
  • Spending more on anti-drug programs to drug producing countries: 14%
  • Hiring more police: 12%
  • Building more prisons: 5%

 

Prominent People Advocating Legalization of Drugs

The solution of the Drug Problem:

http://reigioncults.con1.drugssolution.htm

On the Internet:

 

Prohibition is an awful trip.

 

The Case for Legalization.

 

Should Drugs be Legalized?

 

Getting Off Drugs:

The Legalization Option

 

Alternatives to the War on Drugs:

The Legalization of Drugs

 

NFIA Legalization of Drugs

Legalization of Drugs:

The governor of New Mexico proposed legalizing drugs last week.

 

It might surprise you to know that a very large proportion of economists share that drugs should be legal.

The Ultimate Weapon to Win the War on Drugs: Legalization

 

Spotlight on Medical Marijuana from Free-Market. Net:

The Freedom Network

 

Drugs Laws Do More Harm Than Good:

Repeal Them

Pain-Topics.org News/Research UPDATES: Pain Management Fails Due to Rx-Drug Abuse Fears

In reality, this is a tragedy that has plagued or country since Nixon’s ‘Reign of terror’; i.e. his two-term presidency… the same which caused the continued death toll in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. The terrorism at home was to become an international war, destroying the innermost soul of our police, military and our families in the inner-city, to the suburbs.  The war on drugs became a war on the poor later under Regan/Bush with CRACK.

Fast-Forward to today: M.D.’s  and patients are the newest target of the ‘New Prohibition’.  Doctors are afraid of the “Drug Enforcement Agency” which has become a paramilitary organization fighting against the rights of you and I. They are correct in harboring fears, medical offices must close due to dispensing lifesaving medical treatment to sick people.  All in the name of ‘public safety’ and jaded “morality”.

Opium based treatment options are systematically being eliminated. The Sumerians, Egyptians and the West have safely used opium and newer ‘opiates’ to kill pain and extend the quality of millions of people with minimal division and almost zero risk, but are now “the newest devil” in this costly and dangerous war.

This war has no end; unless saner, cooler heads end what was started almost forty years ago. Shouldn’t we trust our doctors, Government, and Police to have our collective safety – not our systematic demise in mind? Free doctors from this insanity… until this slight is overturned, we cannot truly be free.

Pain-Topics.org News/Research UPDATES: Pain Management Fails Due to Rx-Drug Abuse Fears

Mainstream picks up on poppy legitimization scheme

Back in February I posted about a viable alternative to eradication in the Afghan opium war — embracing the opium poppy as a legitimate resource. Parisian security and policy think-tank Senlis Council issued a report on this issue last month that strongly supports this position.

Well, it looks like the idea is finally gaining a bit of momentum in the mainstream press, with articles and commentary appearing in the Toronto Star and on the AFP Wire.

What is most fascinating about this plan is not only the benefits for Afghanistan’s impoverished farmers, but also the ability to fill the 550  (metric) tonne shortfall worldwide in the demand for legitimate opiate-based pain medication. Poppies are already grown in places like Australia, India and Turkey for legitimate uses, and the market is both well-regulated and profitable for the regions involved.

This clearly has a valid impact on security and stability in the region too, as pointed out by U of T professor Benedikt Fischer, who did research for Senlis and is quoted in the Star story:

"Instead of believing in the crazy idea of us being able to eradicate it, why not use the resource for legitimate and worthwhile purposes"

The eradication policy assumes farmers will switch to other crops. But no alternatives pay enough, so it turns them against the struggling government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai and Canadian and other foreign troops trying to eliminate Taliban insurgents.

Sounds good to me.

Mainstream picks up on poppy legitimization scheme — Poppies.org

America, Inc.: Land of Corporate Reign | Phillip D. Collins

I would wager that most people don’t know what Fascism means… it is really simple; and equally scary because it is what we are living in.

America, Inc.: Land of Corporate Reign

– by Phillip D. Collins ©, July 11th, 2008

Benito Mussolini said, “Fascism should more appropriately be called Corporatism because it is a merger of state and corporate power.”

This model of economic fascism was adopted by Germany and Italy in the 1930s. And, I submit to you that such a marriage between the state and corporate power has taken place here in the United States.

Does this sound like a baseless contention? Allow me to substantiate it with history.

A form of Corporatism began to infect our constitutional republic in the 1930s. It propagated itself under the euphemistic appellation of “planned capitalism” and was hailed as a desirable inevitability. In 1936, Lawrence Dennis published The Coming American Fascism, a polemic contending that America’s adoption of stringent public regulation and the enshrinement of corporate power would invigorate “national spirit.” However, Dennis believed that economic fascism had a major obstacle to overcome. Continue reading America, Inc.: Land of Corporate Reign | Phillip D. Collins

I.O.U.S.A. – One Nation. Under Debt. In Stress.

1:21:29 – 7 months ago

Wake up, America! We’re on the brink of a financial meltdown. I.O.U.S.A. boldly examines the rapidly growing national debt and its consequences for the United States and its citizens. Burdened with an ever-expanding government and military, increased international competition, overextended entitlement programs, and debts to foreign countries that are becoming impossible to honor, America must mend its spendthrift ways or face an economic disaster of epic proportions.

Watch the video below – – >

Continue reading I.O.U.S.A. – One Nation. Under Debt. In Stress.

The Corporation

3:00:06 – 2 years ago
You’d think that things like disasters, or the purity of childhood, or even milk, let alone water or air, would be sacred. But no. Corporations have no built-in limits on what, who, or how much they can exploit for profit. In the fifteenth century, the enclosure movement began to put fences around public grazing lands so that they might be privately owned and exploited. Today, every molecule on the planet is up for grabs. In a bid to own it all, corporations are patenting animals, plants, even your DNA. Around things too precious, vulnerable, sacred or important to the public interest, governments have, in the past, drawn protective boundaries against corporate exploitation. Today, governments are inviting corporations into domains from which they were previously barred. You’d think that things like disasters, or the purity of childhood, or even milk, let alone water or air, would be sacred. But no. Corporati…all 

Continue reading The Corporation

Media Literacy: How the Media Constructs Reality – Totsepedia

KEY CONCEPTS

    1. All media are CONSTRUCTIONS.
    2. All media construct REALITY.
    3. AUDIENCES negotiate meaning in media.
    4. Media have COMMERCIAL implications.
    5. Media contain IDEOLOGICAL and VALUE messages.
    6. Media have SOCIAL and POLITICAL implications.
    7. Media have UNIQUE AESTHETIC FORM that is closely related to CONTENT.

Reprinted from Media Literacy Resource Guide: Intermediate and Senior Division. Toronto: Ontario Ministry of Education, 1989.

Continue reading Media Literacy: How the Media Constructs Reality – Totsepedia

The Hour of Our Time – The Legacy of William Cooper

 

The Hour of Our Time – The Legacy of William Cooper

 

William (Bill) Cooper was a former naval officer, decorated veteran, short wave radio broadcaster and world renowned lecturer and author, he was shot and killed November 5th 2001 under suspicious circumstances. This is his story

Bi-Centennial of Morphine Brings New Info (along with a brief history)

As Morphine Turns 200, Drug That Blocks
Its Side Effects Reveals New Secrets

On May 21, 2005, the world of medicine will celebrate the 200th anniversary of the crystallization of morphine in Einbeck, Germany. Since 1805, morphine and its derivatives have become the most widely used treatment for severe pain. Now more than 230 tons of morphine is used each year for medical purposes including pain relief for patients with chronic pain or advanced medical illness and post-operative analgesia.

Although many new pain relievers have been synthesized since the crystallization of morphine from opium almost 200 years ago, "morphine remains the standard against which all new medications for postoperative pain relief are compared," notes Jonathan Moss, M.D., Ph.D., professor of anesthesia and critical care at the University of Chicago.

Despite 200 years of increasingly frequent use however, even the medical uses of morphine still present problems, such as severe nausea, itching, and constipation.

Moss has been invited to speak at the Einbeck morphine-commemorative conference in May on the relationship between morphine and a drug known as methylnaltrexone — a peripheral opiate antagonist developed at the University of Chicago — which can prevent many of these troubling side effects.

Moss’s lecture, "Morphine’s secrets revealed," will focus on how methylnaltrexone enables scientists to distinguish between the central analgesic effects of morphine and its peripheral side effects.

Discovery of morphine

Morphine was discovered by Freidrich Wilhelm Adam Serturner (1783-1841), an obscure, uneducated, 21-year-old pharmacist’s assistant with little equipment but loads of curiosity.

Serturner wondered about the medicinal properties of opium, which was widely used by 18th-century physicians. In a series of experiments, performed in his spare time and published in 1806, he managed to isolate an organic alkaloid compound from the resinous gum secreted by Papaver somniferum — the opium poppy.

Serturner found that opium with the alkaloid removed had no effect on animals, but the alkaloid itself had ten times the power of processed opium. He named that substance morphine, after Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams, for its tendency to cause sleep. He spent several years experimenting with morphine, often on himself, learning its therapeutic effects as well as its considerable dangers. Although his work was initially ignored, he recognized its significance. "I flatter myself," he wrote in 1816, that "my observations have explained to a considerable extent the constitution of opium, and that I have enriched chemistry with a new acid (meconic) and with a new alkaline base (morphium), a remarkable substance."

As he predicted, chemists and physicians soon grew interested in his discoveries. Serturner’s crystallization of morphine was the first isolation of a natural plant alkaloid. It sparked the study of alkaloid chemistry and hastened the emergence of the modern pharmaceutical industry.

Other researchers soon began to isolate similar alkaloids from organic substances, such as strychnine in 1817, caffeine in 1820 and nicotine in 1828. In 1831, Serturner won a lucrative prize for the discovery.

In 1818, French physician Francois Magendie published a paper that described how morphine brought pain relief and much-needed sleep to an ailing young girl. This stimulated widespread medical interest. By the mid-1820s morphine was widely available in Western Europe in standardized doses from several sources, including the Darmstadt chemical company started by Heinrich Emanuel Merck.

By the 1850s the first reliable syringes were developed and injected morphine became a standard method of reducing pain during and after surgery. Since then, various delivery systems for morphine have been developed, including epidural injection and pumps that allow patient-controlled analgesia.

Although morphine was originally touted as a cure for many maladies, even for opium addiction, by the 1870s physicians had become increasingly aware of its own addictive properties. Ironically, C.R. Alder Wright, a chemist at a London hospital who was searching for a non-addictive alternative to morphine, came up with a more potent narcotic, diacetylmorphine, in 1874.

Heinrich Dreser, a chemist at Bayer Laboratories developed and tested Wright’s new semi-synthetic drug on animals, humans, and most notably himself. Finding that it was a powerful painkiller and appeared effective for a variety of respiratory ailments, Bayer began producing and marketing this drug as an analgesic and a "sedative for coughs" in 1898. Because of its "heroic" ability to relieve pain, they called it heroin.

The medical profession initially welcomed the new drug but soon recognized it’s addictive potential. In 1913, Bayer halted production, edited the drug out of their official company history and focused instead on marketing their second blockbuster drug, aspirin.

Discovery of Methylnaltrexone

Yearly, more than 500,000 patients with advanced cancer depend on powerful opioid-based pain relievers such as morphine, or its derivatives OxyContin or Percocet, for pain relief. One side effect of all narcotic pain relievers is severe constipation, which can be so distressing that many patients discontinue their pain medication.

To solve this problem, the late Leon Goldberg, a University of Chicago pharmacologist, developed methylnaltrexone (MNTX). In order to help a friend with morphine-induced constipation, Goldberg modified naltrexone, an established drug that blocks the effects of morphine, so that it could no longer cross the protective barrier that surrounds the brain. Consequently, it did not interfere with morphine’s effect on pain, which is centered in the brain, but it did block morphine’s effects on gut motility, which are mediated by receptors in the gastrointestinal tract.

Goldberg’s university colleagues continued to develop the compound, testing it in animals and performing the initial human safety trials and clinical studies in volunteers and patients.

The University of Chicago licensed the MNTX technology to UR Labs, Inc. and in 2001, Progenics Pharmaceuticals of Tarrytown, NY, sub-licensed the worldwide exclusive rights to develop MNTX from UR Labs. One phase 3 trial of MNTX for treatment of opioid-induced constipation in patients with advanced medical illness has been completed and results from a second trial were reported May 17 at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting. Progenix has a target date of New Drug Application submission in late 2005.

Meanwhile, Moss and his University colleagues have identified multiple uses of MNTX, beyond the original discovery by Goldberg. Some of these additional uses of MNTX include treatment of post-operative bowel dysfunction (a serious impairment of the gastrointestinal tract following surgery), opioid-induced itching, urinary retention, and possibly HIV.

Opiates appear to increase the ability of HIV to infect certain immune system cells. In 2003, Moss reported that very small amounts of methylnaltrexone blocked these increases. "If our studies are borne out in future clinical trials, methylnaltrexone may improve the care of patients who take opioids for pain caused by AIDS," he said.

"Two hundred years after Serturner’s work, we continue to learn a great deal about morphine," Moss said. "The ability to facilitate pain relief while minimizing side effects is both conceptually important and very relevant to patient care."