Category Archives: drugs

The Drug War’s Effect On Bodies And Minds

The Drug War’s Effect On Bodies And Minds. – DISINFORMATION.COM

The Drug War’s Effect On Bodies And Minds

Posted by JacobSloan onMarch 7, 2012

brokenglassfaceVia Brooklyn Rail, Jason Flores-Williams, a defense lawyer whose father spent sixteen years in prison on drug charges, on the influence of the War on Drugs on how we think:

There are two kinds of power and the drug war’s got them both in spades. The first is we’ll-kick-your-ass power. If you don’t go along with our vision of things, then we’re going to throw you in jail and try to ruin you. It’s the kind of power we think of when we think of China, except that when it comes to the prison-industrial complex we’re actually more repressive than they are.

The second power is foundational to all other forms of power: the power to make people doubt and dislike themselves. All we have to do is look in the mirror to know that the drug war has been an absurdity. Have you ever used drugs? Are you a felon who deserves to go to state prison for it? Are you an enemy of the state? That time last year that you and your husband dropped the kids off for the night at your brother’s house, then smoked weed to have sex in the privacy of your own bedroom—you do realize that makes you a bad person, yes? A good parent would right now call the cops. You should testify against each other. In fact, you and your husband should proceed immediately to the police station and turn yourselves in. And that time last May when your best friend from college came into town and you went out together to that bar that you’ve always wanted to check out and did some blow in the bathroom. Have you reported yourself to the D.E.A.? You unpatriotic scumbag. Or the shrooms you took that Fourth of July at your friend’s pool party—have you cooperated with state and federal authorities, given over the names and addresses of everyone who was there that night? We need you to name names. You must name names. Are you, or have you ever been, a member of the Communist Party?

We let ourselves be criminalized. Forced into the shadows. Made to feel like bad people for relaxing on a Friday night after working 75-hour weeks for the last month and a half. You shouldn’t have been over at your friend’s smoking a joint, talking about what the government needs to do—you should have been back home alone watching TV. We need you isolated. Under control. You don’t know what’s best for you. We know what’s best for you. We are better than you. And everyone on our side, all the people we’ve bought off and put on the payroll, are better than you, too. You just don’t get it: We control the idea of America.

American citizens are being beaten down and oppressed every day because every soul incarcerated means cash money to law enforcement. And more important, the war is a constant reminder that the U.S. government can jail your body and try to own your soul.

I don’t want to sully an article of this calber, but speaking generally America isn’t even remotely in this war.  In fact it has been some time since anyone that isn’t an overbearing sociopath has thought 2 times on the issue to the negative of the current failed (since the 70’s) policy/ policies that we call the rule of law… with a wink, nod, and payment made to South American and Central Asian violent gangs who we probably started or support the fight they do against someone we don’t support for a reason that no one that isn’t on the UNODCP or DEA, INTERPOL, BATFE, or inteligence community INC payment plan could give a half of a shit and 3 drops of piss about.

That’s why Americans sit in jail in the HIGHEST NUMBERS [per capita] in the WORLD (China’s not even close) and you may say: “well those countries just shoot people rather than jail them… guess what ass, we do too.  DEA kicks in the wrong door… bam, your amendment rights are getting on his boot, and what was your floor… before your untimley departure from spaceship earth. Sorry to get all graphic,but this is all too real and it’s time to STOP THE MADNESS! Please do SOMETHING!.

Drug Policy – Fail

 

The Solution of The Drug Problem

 

Drug Dealers out of Business… no more “pushers”:

 

With the Legalization of Drugs, the big billion dollar business of drugs would stop immediately.., the Drug Dealers are the most violently opposed to Legalization of Drugs.

 

As a consequence, there would not be dealers ‘pushing” drugs in our streets and schools, and the number of new addicts due to this big business would disappear.

 

End of Drug Crime:

 

Most of the crime due to drugs would stop, because most of the drug related crime, contrary to alcohol, occurs when the addict is in need of money to buy the drug, not when he has taken it.

 

If Drugs are legalized, the addict would not have to pay huge amounts of money for his drug, up to S200 for a S4 product!, and therefore, he would not have to commit so many crimes to obtain the money.

 

If an alcoholic or a smoker would have to pay $200 for a $4 bottle or a $4 pack, the’ would become criminals, like the addicts, in order to obtain the money.. – In my Medical Office I have seen addicts spending $600 daily for drugs that cost me  $10!.

 

The crimes of the drugs lords competing for territory would also be immediately abolished, because there would be no more drugs lords!,, and no more crimes of not paying any taxes on billions of dollars.

 

Present addicts would have a bonanza, because they could get their drug at normal prices, and probably they would use even more at the beginning. But their crimes would be like nothing compared with the real crimes they actually commit when they urgently need the drug and do not have the huge amounts of money they need to get it.

 

The behavior of the drug-addict is usually different from that of the alcoholic: The alcoholic hits his wife, the addict lets his wife hit him.

 

By now, there is no doubt that most “drug-related murders are the result of drug prohibition. The same kind of violence that came with the Eighteenth’s Amendment ban of alcohol in 1920: The last year of  Prohibition the number of homicides rose to 12,124, and declined to 8,048 after the repeal of Prohibition, in 1941; and the number of assaults came down from 7,863 to 4,525.

 

Repeal of Prohibition was not a capitulation to Al Capone and his ilk, but a means of putting the bootleggers out of business and eliminating most of the crime and costs associated with the Prohibition Laws.

  

Education and Programs against Drug-Addiction… lots of money!

 

The Government is spending actually 10 billion dollars a year in the Drugs War. Besides, the big Business of Drugs do not pay any taxes,.. the SlO billion, plus the tax revenues of selling the drugs is a lot of money that can be used to promote education in Large scale, and many programs against drugs use and abuse.

 

The Actual Addicts: People with a sickness:

 

The addicts would not be considered criminals anymore. but people with a sickness, like alcoholics, and they would have the chance to be treated as such by programs sponsored by the government, similar to those private, actually in existence. Those programs would cost the government a fraction of what it is actually spending to fight drugs.

 

The Pharmacists dispensing the drugs would accompany the product with an “instruction label” explaining honestly the effects of the drug and its real dangers, because, in the heat of the fight, some effects of the drugs have been either overlooked or exaggerated. -. and this would serve as an educational tool, and as an honest warning.

 

The Methadone Program in New York, and the Doctor’s prescriptions of heroine in the Netherlands and Switzerland are good successful examples to fight the problem of drugs.

 

Drug use would not increase:

 

24% of Americans believe that Legalization of Drugs is the solution of the Drug Problem. But many Americans perceive drug legalization as an invitation to drug-infested anarchy. And it is not true: Some people would like to try drugs, once they are available, at reasonable prices, with pure reliable drugs.. and it would lead to a new kind of addicts… however, I believe they would be less in number than those actually “pushed’ into drugs in our schools and streets by the drug-dealers, whose only lucrative business is to push people into drugs and to exploit them… These drug-dealers are totally opposed to the legalization of drugs… and it is a good sign for making them legal…

 

illicit drugs are different that alcohol and tobacco: They are not “social drugs”, and the drugs and methods of consumption are most risky, and unlikely to prove appealing to many people, precisely because they are so obviously dangerous… most Americans would not inject cocaine or heroine in their veins even if given the chance to do so legally.

 

It is also important to know that now a days we can design an effective plan for legalization, after the experiences with tobacco and alcohol abuse… we have learned something from our past experiences:

 

Bans on advertising, campaigns of negative advertising, restriction on time and place of sale, prohibition of consumption in public places, education programs…

 

Legalization of drugs is a leap onto the unknown. no government has ever tried it really! . it may be a risk-v business, but I believe it is worth and prudent to try it Often, legalization is repeatedly and vociferously dismissed: without an attempt to evaluate it openly and objectively. Drug addiction is currently a disaster, the Drugs War is a failure, the only beneficiaries of the actual drug laws are the traffickers…

The war on drugs in America is failing: Thirty million people in America use illegal drugs. Two and a half million of them are addicts, 67% of young Americans try an illicit drug before they finish high school, pushed by the dealers . . and without trying legalization we may never find the best solution for our drug problem.

 

Solutions that may help to solve the Problem of Drugs:

 

Taken from LEGALIZE, based on 8223 responses in America, about what may be helpful and important in solving the drug problem:

 

  • Legalizing Marijuana: 84%
  • Improving the quality of public school education: 60%
  • Spending more on drugs treatment programs: 50%
  • Spending more on anti-drug education in schools: 43%
  • Encouraging more community and police partnerships: 37%
  • Legalizing all drugs: 24%
  • Spending more on anti-drug programs to drug producing countries: 14%
  • Hiring more police: 12%
  • Building more prisons: 5%

 

Prominent People Advocating Legalization of Drugs

The solution of the Drug Problem:

http://reigioncults.con1.drugssolution.htm

On the Internet:

 

Prohibition is an awful trip.

 

The Case for Legalization.

 

Should Drugs be Legalized?

 

Getting Off Drugs:

The Legalization Option

 

Alternatives to the War on Drugs:

The Legalization of Drugs

 

NFIA Legalization of Drugs

Legalization of Drugs:

The governor of New Mexico proposed legalizing drugs last week.

 

It might surprise you to know that a very large proportion of economists share that drugs should be legal.

The Ultimate Weapon to Win the War on Drugs: Legalization

 

Spotlight on Medical Marijuana from Free-Market. Net:

The Freedom Network

 

Drugs Laws Do More Harm Than Good:

Repeal Them

Opioid Analgesics for Chronic Pain

By Mary Lou Bossio, NP

Chronic pain can be one of the more challenging conditions to manage, especially when it has been refractory to multiple modalities. An appreciation of chronic pain and its prevalence, along with thorough understanding of provider responsibilities, patient rights and the appropriateness of opioid analgesics for this population, are needed. Such knowledge provides a foundation for evaluating chronic pain and developing an individualized management plan. When opioids are used, prepare for both expected and unexpected results.

Chronic pain is pain without apparent biologic value that has persisted beyond the time in which normal healing should have occurred, usually 3 months.1 In 2004, chronic pain was internationally recognized as a major health care problem and a disease in its own right.2 Today, countless medical experts and health agencies contend that chronic pain should be treated with the same priority as the disease that caused it.3

History of Standards

The creation and endorsement of formal guidelines for the use of opioid analgesics in chronic pain management is relatively new. The American Pain Society (APS) and the American Academy of Pain Medicine (AAPM) issued a statement in 1996 to define when and how opioids should be prescribed for patients with chronic pain.4

Despite this formal position, pain continued to be undertreated due to fears of legal and criminal liability for prescribing controlled substances.5,6 This prompted the development and 1998 adoption of the Model Guidelines for the Use of Controlled Substances by the Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States.7 This document, which became policy in 2004, defines when opioids are appropriate for acute and chronic pain and details patient monitoring to deter drug diversion.8,9

The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has issued standards on pain assessment and management. The standards, which took effect in 2001, state that all patients have the right to appropriate assessment and management of pain; that all patients should be assessed for pain and receive individualized care; that response to treatment should be monitored; and that treatment plans should be modified when necessary.10

Although the JCAHO standards provided a formal framework for pain management, they did not stipulate how appropriate management would be achieved, and a number of guidelines were subsequently issued.9-12The prevalence of guidelines and JCAHO standards today means that failing to prescribe appropriate medications constitutes undertreatment of pain and a departure from acceptable standards of practice.8

Opioid Need

An analysis of international s
tudies shows that 1 in 5 adults and 1 in 3 older adults experience moderate to severe pain lasting more than 3 to 6 months.1,13 A study of more than 3,500 primary care patients in the United Kingdom found that about half reported pain lasting more than 3 months.
14

And an international study that included the United States revealed that about 20% of more than 5,000 primary care patients experienced pain for more than 6 months.15 Put in everyday terms, as little as 1 in 10 and as many as 1 in 2 patients who present to a health care provider may have chronic pain.

Trends in Prescribing

Arthritis and other musculoskeletal disorders are the most frequently mentioned chronic health conditions significant enough to result in activity limitations among U.S. adults ages 18 to 64.16

An analysis of office visits and opioids prescribed for patients with musculoskeletal disorders in 1980 and 2000 revealed that office visits did not increase for these conditions. This analysis, which was based on data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care survey, also revealed that prescriptions for opioid analgesics for chronic pain doubled (8% to 16%), and the use of stronger opioid analgesics quadrupled (2% to 9%).17

The increase in opioid analgesic prescriptions is a sign that progress has been made in pain management.18-21 However, this trend has not allayed concerns that increased use of opioids would lead to more opioid abuse and addiction. As a result, studies were conducted to identify any abuse of opioid analgesics.

Continue reading Opioid Analgesics for Chronic Pain

Pain-Topics.org News/Research UPDATES: Pain Management Fails Due to Rx-Drug Abuse Fears

In reality, this is a tragedy that has plagued or country since Nixon’s ‘Reign of terror’; i.e. his two-term presidency… the same which caused the continued death toll in Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam. The terrorism at home was to become an international war, destroying the innermost soul of our police, military and our families in the inner-city, to the suburbs.  The war on drugs became a war on the poor later under Regan/Bush with CRACK.

Fast-Forward to today: M.D.’s  and patients are the newest target of the ‘New Prohibition’.  Doctors are afraid of the “Drug Enforcement Agency” which has become a paramilitary organization fighting against the rights of you and I. They are correct in harboring fears, medical offices must close due to dispensing lifesaving medical treatment to sick people.  All in the name of ‘public safety’ and jaded “morality”.

Opium based treatment options are systematically being eliminated. The Sumerians, Egyptians and the West have safely used opium and newer ‘opiates’ to kill pain and extend the quality of millions of people with minimal division and almost zero risk, but are now “the newest devil” in this costly and dangerous war.

This war has no end; unless saner, cooler heads end what was started almost forty years ago. Shouldn’t we trust our doctors, Government, and Police to have our collective safety – not our systematic demise in mind? Free doctors from this insanity… until this slight is overturned, we cannot truly be free.

Pain-Topics.org News/Research UPDATES: Pain Management Fails Due to Rx-Drug Abuse Fears

Mainstream picks up on poppy legitimization scheme

Back in February I posted about a viable alternative to eradication in the Afghan opium war — embracing the opium poppy as a legitimate resource. Parisian security and policy think-tank Senlis Council issued a report on this issue last month that strongly supports this position.

Well, it looks like the idea is finally gaining a bit of momentum in the mainstream press, with articles and commentary appearing in the Toronto Star and on the AFP Wire.

What is most fascinating about this plan is not only the benefits for Afghanistan’s impoverished farmers, but also the ability to fill the 550  (metric) tonne shortfall worldwide in the demand for legitimate opiate-based pain medication. Poppies are already grown in places like Australia, India and Turkey for legitimate uses, and the market is both well-regulated and profitable for the regions involved.

This clearly has a valid impact on security and stability in the region too, as pointed out by U of T professor Benedikt Fischer, who did research for Senlis and is quoted in the Star story:

"Instead of believing in the crazy idea of us being able to eradicate it, why not use the resource for legitimate and worthwhile purposes"

The eradication policy assumes farmers will switch to other crops. But no alternatives pay enough, so it turns them against the struggling government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai and Canadian and other foreign troops trying to eliminate Taliban insurgents.

Sounds good to me.

Mainstream picks up on poppy legitimization scheme — Poppies.org

There’s more collateral damage than victories in this War on Drugs

There’s more collateral damage than victories in this War on Drugs

Shayne Morrow, Alberni Valley Times

Published: Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Just a random sampling of headlines should be enough to convince the average reader that there’s no winners in the war on drugs. At least, not on the side of the alleged good guys.

This week, pot activist Marc Emery was to surrender himself to Canadian authorities, who will in turn transport him to their counterparts in the U.S., where he will serve five years in prison for selling millions of dollars worth of marijuana seeds by mail.

One can debate the rightness or wrongness of Emery’s business, or the wisdom of marketing anything drug-related in the States, where even puffers can end up doing hard time.

The Truth about The American Drug War

 The War on Drugs

June 14, 2010

Since 1970, $33 billion has been spent marketing drug prevention campaigns to school kids. However, from 1970, the decrease in drug use among high school students is still 0%. In reality, the increase in Americans who will try drugs this year compared to 1970 is 10 million. Someone is arrested for violating the drug law every 17 seconds, and 37 million people have been arrested in the US for drug crimes. The total amount spent on those arrests comes to $121 billion. As the numbers of drug users increases, the numbers of visits to the doctor will correlate, especially in the near future. Medical billing and coding specialists are needed by all doctors, which means that this is a profession that will not become obsolete, but rather the demand for it is perpetually growing. Furthermore, medical billing and coding specialists are needed to aid millions of Americans involved with drugs.

The War on Drugs
Truth About The War on Drugs

Via: Medical Coding Certification

Can a Pill Make You Smarter?

Can a Pill Make You Smarter?

Can a Pill Make You Smarter?

A series of new drugs promises to increase our productivity and focus.

By Joanne Chen

A series of new drugs promises to increase our productivity and focus.

I would have made the perfect poster child for the “Just Say No” campaign. Black coffee — lots of it — is my only vice. I militantly oppose tobacco, sleeping pills, and excessive alcohol. I assert a defiant Non! to marijuana, cocaine, and steroids (not that anyone has ever offered me any). Somehow, I made it through prep school and college among the most prudish of friends. To me, anyone who engaged in chemical enhancements was a slacker or a cheater, and most certainly someone I didn’t know.

But then I discovered Smart Drugs. Crack for nerds.
Continue reading Can a Pill Make You Smarter?

The Pain Relief Network | Blog | Why is This News Not Fit to Print?

The New York Times… Americana, the “story”.  No spin just good old fash….. oh never mind I neglected to mention that; though factual the “story” might just go away without seeing the ink of the press, or even the ~$.000001 worth of HTML on the NYT.com site. All the news that the ___________________ wants you to know about and all the ____________________ that the government / corporation that has the full page ad that week doesn’t feel too squeamish about seeing in the paper.

What good is freedom of the press; when it’s used as freedom from the press?

CASE IN POINT:

Dec 18, 2004
By: Siobhan Reynolds
Painreliefnetwork.org

Letter to the New York Times

Dear Mr. Okrent,

I have written your office on several other occasions and have not received a reply. Following the Times’ failure to cover the criminal trial of Dr. William Hurwitz and the pain movement that is being crushed by the United States government, I felt that I had to voice my complaint again and request a meeting with you.

I supplied Adam Liptak with a letter from 6 former presidents of the American Pain Society denouncing the testimony of the government’s key expert witness against Dr. Hurwitz. The language could not have been stronger, an astonishing political development-that has again, gone unreported.

I have spoken to several reporters at the Times who made it clear that the paper was aware of the trial and of the other cases that PRN is supporting, we were yet again on the front page of the Washington Post when Dr. Hurwitz was convicted, the DEA withdrew its FAQ document and has since openly intimidated the medical community with a new statement of the law-the intimidation acknowledged by the AMA! and still nothing from the New York Times.

Celebrex and Vioxx have been shown to be tremendously dangerous and have been withdrawn from the market while opioids are nontoxic to major organ systems but their availability is actively suppressed by the US Department of Justice-we have a CSA that judges drugs according to law enforcement notions rather than scientific ones, and still the New York Times cannot find the story.

Patients and doctors are intimidated. Families are being ruined. Physicians are being required to act as policemen in the doctor patient relationship-the DEA says that doctors acting in good faith have nothing to fear and the SAME DAY that Tandy announces this “reassuring” position in USA Today, the US Attorney prosecuting Hurwitz asks the judge to leave the good faith instruction out of his charges to the jury which this unapologetically biased judge did.

Still nothing.

Dr. Hurwitz had his 2 million dollar bond revoked and was thrown in jail immediately-someone who could not again commit the crime he had been convicted of-and still nothing.

What, Mr. Okrent, does it take to persuade the New York Times to cover this story?

I live in New York City and will be available to meet at your convenience. Given the fact that your paper looked at the ethical problems surrounding Barry Meier’s reporting and gave yourselves a clean bill of health, I would have thought you would be eager to avoid any more misunderstandings regarding your coverage of the pain issue. I must say that I am shocked by your paper’s failure to cover this story.

Thank You for Your Prompt Attention to This Matter,

Siobhan Reynolds
President
Pain Relief Network

Where is this story… next to the East Timor ones most likely.  I’m not picking on the Times…. Journalism is now Marketing / Propaganda with a smile and a catchy story too. I just see snakes and deceit.  Next time you want “NEWS” just f***g GOOGLE it or BING it. The NYT is fresh out of the truth.

The Pain Relief Network | Blog | Why is This News Not Fit to Print?

Police Chief says "Legalize It" to HEROIN

Legalise heroin and sell it
on street, says police chief

By Nigel Bunyan
North Wales police chief Richard Brunstrom

Richard Brunstrom: 'legalise heroin and sell it on the street'

Richard Brunstrom, who is in charge of North Wales police, said he believed that the drug laws were doing “more harm than good.” They left vulnerable people in danger, while enabling criminals to make massive profits. Continue reading Police Chief says "Legalize It" to HEROIN